The New Normal of Scuba Diving in Bali

The New Normal of Scuba Diving in Bali

Life is different after the pandemic hit. We protected ourself and those we love by locking ourself down on home. Movements are limited. We dare not to get out unless for it’s urgent or necessary. Travelling, during the mandatory quarantine, was out of question. However, today most governments has lifted travel bans and soon, we will be out exploring the beautiful world once again. Bali, as one of prominent holiday destination in the world, is now preparing itself for the new normal for travelers post the covid. Travelling and scuba diving in Bali will not be entirely the same again. Here’s how travelers and divers alike should prepare themselves on the new normal.

Is scuba diving in Bali really safe? 

The New Normal of Scuba Diving in Bali

This is probably the most frequently asked questions for everyone. Can you contract coronavirus from the water? Research based on other coronavirus strains like SARS can survive for 12 days in room temperature tap water and more in sewage. However, experts agree that infectious droplets would be so diluted when it goes into large bodies of water. It means the concentration of coronavirus in lake, rivers, and ocean would be very low. Therefore, contracting the coronavirus on the ocean will be quite hard. In addition for that, fishes and marine species are not known to transmit the coronavirus. The virus can only infect certain species of hosts on selected temperature range. The perfect candidates for it are warm blooded mammals, which is favourable for the virus to flourish and multiply. Marine animals mostly can’t survive with such temperature. 

Health check before going for scuba diving in Bali 

Before you go, make sure you comply all the health standards imposed on the region. Bali, for example, follows general Indonesia’s rules on which all travelers fill COVID-19 Health Declaration and Liability Release Form. You should send these forms to the dive centre prior to the departure. Every divers should also prove their dive liability by attaching COVID-negative test result from rapid/ swab test. 

Do your own scuba gears 

Scuba diving in Bali during the new normal demand you to be totally independent. No more relying on the diving operator to do your suits. Minimise direct contact by learning how to do your own gears properly.  

Whenever possible, wear your own regulators and suits

The New Normal of Scuba Diving in Bali

The new normal is the right time to start investing on your basic personal scuba gears. Go scuba diving in Bali feeling safer and more protected by wearing very personal gears like regulators, mask, and suits of your own.  

Cover your nose and mouth before going underwater

The underwater is the safest zone for any divers. Keep your face mask intact in all public place and that includes during the boat. Change your mask once it wet and every time after diving. Bring extra spare mask in a water-resistant pouch. 

Go scuba diving in Bali with small, trusted groups 

Gone were the days when you can join strange random people in large group for scuba diving in Bali. It were fun, but now it could be dangerous for everyone’s health. Go diving with small group or better, only with people you trust. 

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Practice social distancing 

Everywhere you go, social/ physical distancing is the mandatory. This is the new normal and you should never forget it—especially in confined space like dive boat.  

Disinfect everything by yourself

Diving and overall travelling on the new normal requires us to be squeaky clean. Bring sanitiser in your dive bag. Wash hands using the 20 seconds rule with soap and possibly, hot water. Discards your tissue properly and sanitise your hands immediately. Wipe everything down with disinfectants between dives and trips. Never think what you do with the cleanliness is enough.